Exhibition

Katie Torn: Myopia’s Toil

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Katie Torn, Myopia’s Toil, 2015. Courtesy the artist and Art in General.
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Katie Torn, Myopia’s Toil (installation view), 2015.
Single channel stereoscopic video installation, 1:26 minute endless loop.
Courtesy the artist and Art in General. Photo: Charles Benton.
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Katie Torn, Myopia’s Toil (still), 2015.
Single channel stereoscopic video installation, 1:26 minute endless loop.
Courtesy the artist and Art in General. Photo: Charles Benton.
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Katie Torn, Myopia’s Toil (still), 2015.
Single channel stereoscopic video installation, 1:26 minute endless loop.
Courtesy the artist and Art in General. Photo: Charles Benton.
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May 16, 2015–Jun 27, 2015
Exhibition
Katie Torn: Myopia’s Toil
Exhibition

Katie Torn: Myopia’s Toil

Katie Torn
Opening Reception:
Saturday, May 16, 6–8pm

Exhibition:
May 16, 2015 – June 27, 2015
Musée Minuscule

Press Release: Download PDF

Art in General is pleased to present Myopia’s Toil with Katie Torn in the Musée Minuscule.

New York-based artist Katie Torn integrates animation, 3D computer graphics, and video to model virtually simulated scenes out of the detritus of internet and consumer culture. Collecting elements available online, Torn’s digital assemblages carry traces of web browsing histories. Referencing the Modernist traditions of Cubism and Futurism in her avatars and abstractions, fantasy worlds and sci-fi simulations are conflated with 20th century investigations into pictorial space.

Torn’s hybrids offer a vision of new forms and substances that fuse organic and synthetic materials. Female cyborgs are presented as Frankenstein-like monoliths; the surface of their bodies smooth like plastic dolls or skin treated by reconstructive surgery. Elements comingle in an uncomfortable conflation of innocence and adulteration—playful, childhood toys rendered in soft pastels reside in toxic, apocalyptic environments. Operating in close relation to the “natural” world, biomorphic forms excrete and ingest brightly colored liquid into and from their surrounds, suggesting a life-force akin to oil or blood.

Myopia’s Toil features a newly created digital sculpture for Art in General’s Musée Minuscule to be viewed through 3D glasses. Combining built and found 3D models, Torn collages disparate items: plant foliage, derricks, and anime characters with exaggerated features. In an alien landscape reminiscent of video game environments, a looping narrative unfolds of evolution, self-destruction, and regeneration.

Katie Torn has exhibited her work at national and international locations including XPO Gallery, Paris (2015); NUTUREart, Brooklyn (2014); Postmasters, New York (2014); Upfor Gallery, Portland (2014); MOMA PS1, New York (2014); Roots & Cultures Contemporary Art Center, Chicago (2013); MOCA, Los Angeles (2013); and Bitforms Gallery, New York (2013). She received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2012) and BA from Hunter College (2007). Torn was a 2013 Fellow at the Eyebeam Art & Technology Center and a 2014 Artist in Residence at IEA Alfred University. Upcoming exhibitions include the Window Display at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin, FILE Electronic Language International Festival in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and Black Box New Media Festival in Seattle.


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Art in General was founded in Lower Manhattan in 1981 and supports the production of new work by local and international artists primarily through its New Commissions Program and its International Collaborations program.  Art in General also produces an annual symposium What Now? on critical and timely issues in artistic and curatorial practice.

General Support of Art in General is provided by General Hardware Manufacturing Inc.; the Institute of Museum and Library Services; the Lambent Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; Ruth Ivor Foundation; The Greenwich Collection; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; Toby D. Lewis Donor Advised Fund of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland; the William Talbott Hillman Foundation; and by individuals. This program is also supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

The New Commissions Program is made possible by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Trust for Mutual Understanding; National Endowment for the Arts; and Jerome Foundation. Support has also been provided by Commissioners’ Circle leaders Jeffery Larsen and Joseph Bolduc; Commissioners’ Circle supporter Cher Lewis, and Commissioners’ Circle members Roya Khadjavi-Heidari, Mary Lapides, Richard Massey, Ron and Lucille Neeley, and Leslie Ruff.

Additional special support provided by ROOT Studios.