Exhibition

Daphne Fitzpatrick: The Baton

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, Untitled, 2014. Courtesy the artist and American Contemporary

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, The Baton, installation view, 2014. Photo: Charles Benton. Image courtesy the artist and Art in General

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, The Baton, installation view, 2014. Photo: Charles Benton. Image courtesy the artist and Art in General

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, The Baton, installation view, 2014. Photo: Charles Benton. Image courtesy the artist and Art in General

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, The Baton, installation view, 2014. Photo: Charles Benton. Image courtesy the artist and Art in General

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, The Baton, installation view, 2014. Photo: Charles Benton. Image courtesy the artist and Art in General

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, The Baton, installation view, 2014. Photo: Charles Benton. Image courtesy the artist and Art in General

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Daphne Fitzpatrick, The Baton, installation view, 2014. Photo: Charles Benton. Image courtesy the artist and Art in General

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RELATED EVENTS

Nov 7, 2014
Opening
Winter Exhibitions Opening
Nov 7, 2014–Jan 10, 2015
Exhibition
Daphne Fitzpatrick: The Baton
New Commissions

Daphne Fitzpatrick: The Baton

Daphne Fitzpatrick
Curated by Kristen Chappa

Exhibition: November 7, 2014–January 10, 2015
Opening reception: Friday, November 7, 2014, 6–8pm

Press release: Download .pdf

Art in General is pleased to present The Baton, a New Commission by Daphne Fitzpatrick in the Storefront Project Space. This project marks Fitzpatrick’s first US-based solo institutional exhibition.

Located somewhere between Duchamp and slapstick comedy, Daphne Fitzpatrick’s photography, found objects, and mixed-media installations infuse the quotidian with uncanny meaning through repetition, shifts in scale, and eyebrow-raising juxtapositions. In her work, cultural references from the Western art historical canon to Groucho Marx all coexist using the language of surrealism and the organizing structure of the non-sequitur. The artist is equally fascinated by the history of the flâneur and the tastes of the dandy; those who developed a refined aesthetic position by appropriating neglected or subversive characteristics of the urban landscape.

For Fitzpatrick’s newly commissioned project at Art in General, sculpture and photography—the two dominant mediums of her practice—are presented side by side. Scrolling images that will be updated over the course of the exhibition’s run offer a look into art and street life through Fitzpatrick’s eyes. Like a stream of consciousness in pictures, we see the figure moving through the city. Seemingly disconnected at the outset, these sequences reveal narratives through selection and careful cropping. Key to her photography is the drama and intimacy of the close-up that highlights emotional content in specific moments, as well as capturing readymade objects “made” by forces of nature such as wind, sun, or the trampling of feet.

The artist’s object-making has a light touch akin to the sensibility of her images; she resists over-working materials in favor of gesture and intuition. Like one-line poems, her three dimensional forms seem to manifest with the immediacy of a camera click. On view, the figure reappears in Fitzpatrick’s sculptural installation as a French baguette scaled to six feet high, co-mingling with an upended, Magritte-style pipe. Such uses of off-kilter jokes and semiotic witticisms connect to a broader practice rooted in radical feminism, where seemingly laughable statements about sex and gender often sway toward the crude or abject. Fitzpatrick’s work offers up a contemporary brand of identity politics that reveals elusive and unconscious complexities over essentializing features or overtly didactic statements. In the vein of gallows humor, visual or linguistic jokes manage underlying anxieties.

Daphne Fitzpatrick was born in Long Island, New York and is currently based in Brooklyn. She attended the School of Visual Arts and the Whitney Independent Study Studio Program. Her works have been included in notable exhibitions such as: One Thing Then Another (2014) Artist Curated Projects (ACP), Los Angeles, CA; A Look from Abroad (2012), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan; It is what it is. Or is it? (2012), curated by Dean Daderko, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, TX; Photography Sculpture Figure (2012), M + B, Los Angeles, CA; Art Book Club Presents: Cowboy Mouth (2011), St. Cecilia’s Convent, Greenpoint, NY; Tomboy (2011), Columbia College Glass Curtain Gallery, Chicago, IL; This is a performance (2010), Artist Curated Projects (ACP), Los Angeles, CA; A Trip Down (False) Memory Lane (2009), The Lexington Club, San Francisco, CA; Shared Women (2007), curated by A.L. Steiner, Eve Fowler, and Emily Roysdon, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE), Los Angeles, CA; Ridykeulous (2006), Participant, Inc., New York, NY; and Neoqueer (2004), Center on Contemporary Art, Seattle, WA.



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General Support of Art in General is provided by General Hardware Manufacturing Inc.; the Institute of Museum and Library Services; the Lambent Foundation; the New York State Council on the Arts with support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; The Greenwich Collection; Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation; Agnes Gund; the William Talbott Hillman Foundation; and by individuals. This program is also supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

The New Commissions Program is made possible by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Trust for Mutual Understanding; National Endowment for the Arts; and Jerome Foundation. Support has also been provided by Commissioners’ Circle leaders Jeffery Larsen and Joseph Bolduc; Commissioners’ Circle supporters Sandra Ho and Jang Kim, and Cher Lewis, and Commissioners’ Circle members Roya Khadjavi-Heidari, Mary Lapides, Richard Massey, Leslie Ruff, and Jeremy E. Steinke.

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